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To this extent, we cannot be sure of the veracity of the facts. What is more, I have found a source that contradicted the fact that Marie Robine foresaw Joan of Arc. The white sign, the very place where she died. Joan of Arc herself foresaw her mission. She supposedly knew that the Dauphin Charles would eventually be restored.

She also predicted that the English would be defeated and driven out of France, except for those who would die there. Eventually, she asked the voices if she would be burnt at the stake.

Charles Martel was a descendant of Charlemagne King of the France in 8th century. The voices supposedly told Joan about where she would find it and fight with it herself. Other soothsayers were said to have foreseen Joan of Arc. They are mentioned but little is known about what was said exactly. She did not until May 24 th when the Bishop of Beauvais Pierre Cauchon decided to stage her execution. In fact, Joan of Arc carried on saying that she would not stop fighting and wearing men clothes as long as God did not stop her. That was cruel but seemed to work on Joan. In fact, the bishop was a counsellor of the King of England, Henry V.

St. Francis Borgia

Unfortunately, Joan of Arc returned to her old habits of wearing men clothes and was sentenced to death again. In order to legitimate his title, he needed her to be rehabilitated. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Jan 24, Guille Puerto rated it did not like it. In the last of the series, the author changes his omiscient narrator to the voice of a full-of-himself church official, remembering in conversation with different silent companions in a very long carriage journey the events of the past year in France and the start of the year war.

It feels lazy and unimaginative, the style sticks to a very specific point of view and lets the reader guess at missinterpretations and prejudices from the unreliable narrator, but not in a credible fashion.

I In the last of the series, the author changes his omiscient narrator to the voice of a full-of-himself church official, remembering in conversation with different silent companions in a very long carriage journey the events of the past year in France and the start of the year war. Instead of being awestruck by the actions and decisions of King John the Good and The Black Prince, one gets tired of the pompous old man narrating them,interrupting the story every three pages so nobody forgets who is telling it. Druon gives the Papal Nounce his voice and his bias as a french writer, and that makes it passable, but the page monologue gets boring really quick.

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Cardinal mostly wanders in circles offering his musings on politics, ruling, and expounds on the history and state of affairs in France, England, and gives more details than necessary about the ecclesiastical affairs in Rome and Avignon, which can tire the reader, as it reads like historical infodump and is uninteresting.

This is somewhat alleviated by the tidbits of court gossip that the ecclesiastic includes to make it more amenable, scandalous enough to be entertaining but never verging on the salacious. He tells about the last six months of Philippe VI, when the monarch scandalises the Court and the whole of Christendom by taking for himself the betrothed meant for his son and heir, little Blanche of Navarre, nubile and very beautiful, who excites in him such passions that he goes to hilarious extents to improve his manly potency, killing himself out of exhaustion in half a year, leaving her a lusty widow and his Dauphin an embittered man who convinces himself that he loves the woman, but never takes her.

And, as with his English counterpart, this favourite will bring upon the royal head the wrath of the powerful barons when an honour too many is bestowed on him.

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By now, the Cardinal is more involved in the unfolding events, being present at some and an active participant in others, so his narration has more of the first-hand eyewitness feel, though the second-hand information never disappears. The tomato shrub manages to hop from one mistake to the next in all matters. The problem is, he gave the Spaniard the lands that had been of Jeanne of Navarre, mother to Charles the Bad. Far from serving as a wake-up call to Jean II to pay attention to his crumbling realm, this leaves him catatonic and wandering like a lost soul through the palace corridors, crying, which earns him the scorn of the Dauphin Charles.

The murderers flee to England, where they ally themselves with Edward III, who forces the French to accept a damning treaty and be reconciled with Charles of Navarre, ceding him half of Normandy. After the personal and political faux pas, the military ones follow. He makes poor choices by ravaging of the countryside, his pursuit of rebels and English, allows Lancaster to slip through his fingers by an astoundingly childish trick, has one enormous siege tower built only for it to be burnt on the first shock The exhausted Cardinal throws his hands up in despair and tells them all to go to hell with his blessing, not aware yet of how disastrous the fight will be for his king, his country and his only family.

Amidst the chaos and slaughter of the French nobility, the Dauphin is forced to flee with his brothers, his uncle, and leaves his father to fight alone. Not really, his year-old youngest son Philippe stays to fight side by side with Jean II till the end, being more of a nuisance than a help, though courageous for his age and inexperience.

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Courage is what also redeems the French king, who refuses to flee and fights like someone possessed whilst outnumbered by the English round him, and is made a prisoner. Not only that: the style is different, with the point of view in first person that is so limiting and restricts the narrative potentialities by filtering events through the eyes of a single narrator. Until I had an idea earlier today that it could be symmetry.

George R. The Accursed Kings may have ended in the 6th book, but the circle was still open and demanded closure. One king made France, the other had to lose France. One king started the curse, the other had to complete it.

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Seen through that lens, the title is appropriate, the storyline makes sense, and the ending, though still abrupt, also makes sense. Nevertheless, this still feels more like a rescindable complement than a continuation of the series. It wasn't to my liking, though it could be for others. View all 30 comments.

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Jan 20, Solymar rated it it was ok. The most boring of the 7 books View 1 comment. I can see why they didn't initially bother to translate this book.


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The King Without a Kingdom is told from a first person point of view, a style that doesn't follow the format of the other 6 books, which I enjoyed. The content could have and should have been interesting, but the delivery was definitely lacking. Quand Maurice Druon perd ses lecteurs I liked all the previous books in the series, especially the book six.

This last book though Clearly Maurice Druon wanted to try a new narration form, but why he adapted the worst form possible is above my understanding. The story of king Jean II's disastrous ruling is told by a cardinal, a papal legate, during his long journey across France.

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But it's not a typical first person narration. Rather, it's the cardinal's dialogue with his travel Quand Maurice Druon perd ses lecteurs Rather, it's the cardinal's dialogue with his travel companions where you get to hear only his part of the conversation. Even though the historical events he tells about are interesting, this endless droning monologue format makes the story just as exciting for the reader as the slow and boring voyage must have been entertaining for the cardinal.

Druon attempts to finish off again his 'The Accursed Kings' series with a novel that falls as flat as Jean II's attempt to flex his muscle across Western Europe. Before delving into the review, I must admit that without a proper English translation of the text, yet wanting to read the final act in this highly entertaining series, I was forced to push the text through an online translation page, leaving me with disjointed and somewhat literal translation of the text.

It made for a sometimes hor Druon attempts to finish off again his 'The Accursed Kings' series with a novel that falls as flat as Jean II's attempt to flex his muscle across Western Europe. It made for a sometimes horrific read, while I will discuss a little later on. Told in a letter-type format, the novel follows some of France's key events that led to Jean II pushing his military might up against England and its allied kingdoms.

While the entire series has hinted at this drunken power of French kings, it is in this novel that the ultimate price is paid and Jean II leads his men into the trap that ultimately pushes them to the brink and leaves England as the European superpower, at least in its western kingdoms.